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Best Hammock Tree Straps and Suspensions – 2017 Buyer’s Guide

best hammock tree straps suspensions

Our choices for the Best Hammock Straps and Suspensions:

NameTypeBest UseMT Rank
ENO Atlas StrapsDaisy-ChainGeneral UseSolid Pick
Nature's HangOut HangTight StrapsDaisy-ChainGeneral UseSolid Pick
Kammok Python StrapsDaisy-ChainGeneral UseTop Pick
Dutchware Dutch Buckle Suspension KitWhoopie-SlingBackpackingTop Pick
Dutchware Cinch-Buckle Complete SuspensionCinch-BuckleBackpackingSolid Pick
Dutchware Whoopie-Hook SuspensionWhoopie-SlingBackpackingLight-Weight Pick

Read below for more info about our favorite hammock tree straps!

In order to string up your hammock, you need some tree straps! Pro hammock campers like to call these suspension systems.  Some are super lightweight (less to carry when backpacking) but are a little harder to use.  Some are super simple, but usually come with a bit of a weight penalty. No worry, we’ll give you the 411 on the best hammock straps, both weight-conscious and simple-to-use!

Contents (Jump Ahead in this Article)

Best Hammock Straps and Suspensions for General Use
Best Hammock Straps and Suspensions For Backpacking
Factors for Choosing Hammock Straps

 

Best Hammock Straps / Suspensions for General Use

ENO Atlas Straps

Likely the most common hammock suspension on the planet: the ENO Atlas Straps. This simple “daisy-chain” style design makes hanging your hammock a breeze!

Pros

  • Simple, easy-to-use, nearly fool-proof
  • Exceptional durability
  • Versatile

Cons

  • Heavy and bulky
  • Not able to handle precision adjustments

Conclusions

I’d venture to guess that a daisy-chain style hammock suspension like the ENO Atlas Straps is a great choice for a good 90% of hammock users out there. Most hammockers use their hammock at home, not to far from their car, or on a short hike.  As such, these simple and functional tree straps are fantastic for typical hammock use.  As long as there are loops on the end of your hammock that can be attached to the Atlas Straps with a carabiner, you are good to go!

If you are a backpacker that uses your hammock for camping, you might think twice about bringing these along.  I myself have definitely backpacked with them, and they won’t break your back. Yet at 11 ounces / 311 grams (plus weight of an average climbing grade carabiner being 1.5 ounces / 43 grams), this suspension system is about 3 times the weight of the very lightweight Dutchware Whoopie Hook system. If you are backpacker that is weigh-conscious (about your pack, not your belt-line), this is a concern.

However, the ENO Atlas Straps do have an advantage for backpackers when it comes to versatility.  A hammock using a whoopie-sling style suspension typically needs about 18 feet / 5.5 meters between trees in order to work well. The Atlas Straps are versatile enough to handle shorter spans (12 feet / 3.7 meters or so) and the longer spans in the 20 foot range alike. If you are a backpacker, the ENO Atlas Straps may be something to keep in your gear arsenal, but may get left at home in favor of a lighter weight system when the trip itinerary is planned with plenty of hanging options.

There is one other caveat for the argument for the Atlas straps: the Nature’s Hangout Hangtight Straps and Kammok Python Straps are both improved versions of the same design! Read more about those below.

If you have big trees or a long span you want hang on, check out the ENO Atlas XL Straps. Think that black is boring? Check out the ENO Atlas Chroma series of cool colorways. Atlas straps are also available in camo.

Check current prices for the ENO Atlas Straps:

Nature’s Hangout HangTight Hammock Straps

Another daisy-chain style suspension, the Nature’s Hangout HangTight Straps are an improved take on the ENO Atlas Straps.  The ENO straps work great, but these straps take the same concept and make it even better.

Pros

  • Simple, easy-to-use, nearly fool-proof
  • Exceptional durability and strength
  • Versatile
  • Great precision for design-category

Cons

  • Heavy and bulky
  • Adjustments are not as precise as other systems

Conclusions

At first glace, the NHO Hangtight Hammock Straps just seem like a knock-off of the ENO Atlas Straps.  However, the Hangtight straps take the innovative design of the Atlas straps and make some improvements. First, the loops are an inch shorter, creating 16 loops per strap that improve precision and increase the chance of finding the perfect angles when hanging the hammock. Second, the loops are stitched flat as opposed to the folded design of the Atlas straps.  This makes for a savings in material and a more compact transport size after rolling them up.  Third, the Hangtights have better stitching that makes for a ridiculous breaking strength of 2200 lbs / 1000 kg.

One item of note about the breaking strength of this product: you won’t ever come close to put 2200 pounds of tension on your hammock, not unless you’re filling your hammock with bricks! So the improved breaking strength provides a nice peace of mind, but the 400 lb / 180 kg breaking strength of the Atlas straps is perfectly fine in the vast majority of hanging circumstances.

When it comes to the weight of the Hangtight straps, they are actually pretty close to the ENOs, with the Hangtights weighing 13 oz / 369 grams versus the Atlas at 11 oz / 311 grams.  Of course, the Hangtight straps are also a foot longer on each strap, and the Hangtights include their carrying bag in the product weight.

Overall, the NHO Hangtight Hammock Straps have similar pros and cons to the ENO Atlas Straps, the Hangtight straps are just an improved design. If you have the option of one or the other, I’d recommend grabbing the Hangtight straps!  Also have a look at my favorite daisy-chain style straps: Kammok Python Straps (more on those below).

Also consider grabbing the NHO Hangtight Straps and Carabiners combo and save the time of trying to figure out which ‘biners to buy.

Check current prices for the Nature’s Hangout Hangtight Hammock Straps:

Kammok Python Straps

Similar to the NHO Hangtight Straps, the Kammok Python Straps are an improved version of the daisy-chain style hammock suspension system. They even come with a few extra loops compared to the Hangtights, and come in a sweet colorway to boot!

Pros

  • Simple, easy-to-use, nearly fool-proof
  • Exceptional durability and strength
  • Versatile
  • Great precision for design-category

Cons

  • Heavy and bulky
  • Adjustments are not as precise as other systems

Conclusions

The Kammok Python Straps are yet another solid daisy-chain style suspension system. Like NHO Hangtight Straps, the Pythons have the same advantages over the ENO Atlas Straps, with their own slightly unique characteristics as well.  The Python straps have 18 loops for strap, offering the maximum precision for this type of hammock system. The loops are stitched flat which allows for a tighter packed size and slight weight savings. They aren’t as “heavy-duty” as the Hangtights, but they are rated to hold up to 500 pounds / 225 kgs which is plenty!

Another cool thing about these straps are the reflective coating which makes for better visibility and less accidents when moving around the hammock in low light.  I also think the metallic silver is a really sweet colorway, especially when paired with a Kammok Roo Hammock.

For backpacking, these straps are on the heavy side (12 oz / 340 grams) but are definitely a viable option, especially when you want maximum versatility as these straps can span nearly anything, short or long.

Overall, the Kammok Python Straps are my top pick for daisy-chain style suspensions, and is the best choice all-around for general purpose hammock hanging.

Purchase Kammock Python Straps from these retailers:

Best Hammock Straps / Suspensions for Backpacking

There are a good number of “cottage” hammock gear makers putting out high-quality specialized hammock suspensions specifically for backpacking. Of these, Dutchware has set itself apart with incredibly innovative designs, and in my opinion the top choices for hammock suspensions for backpacking come out of the Dutchware lineup.

For instance, aside from the popular buy heavy daisy-chain style systems, the most common and useful hammock suspension are cinch-buckle style ones, and whoopie-slings. Dutchware has not only made their own quality versions of these systems, but added innovative features that make them even better. Each Dutchware suspension also comes with a Dutch Clip, an innovative piece of hardware that makes it easier and faster to attach and detach the tree straps from the tree.

Dutchware Dutch Buckle Suspension Kit

Among hammock suspension systems, the Dutchware Dutch Buckle Suspension Kit might be the best combination of quality, versatility, and weight-savings. In my opinion, it’s the most well-rounded strap system for hammock backpacking that money can buy.

best hammock suspension backpacking

The Dutchware Dutch Buckle Suspension Kit, via Dutchware

Specs

Source: dutchware.com

With whoopie slings, Dutch Clips, and 6′ tree staps included.

  • Weight: 5.7 ounces / 163 grams

Pros

  • Relatively simple and easy-to-use
  • Versatile
  • Lightweight
  • Allows for precision adjustments

Cons

  • Can’t handle shorter spans without modification
  • Whoopie-sling attachment may require modifying hammock

Conclusions

The Dutchware Dutch Buckle Suspension Kit is basically like a whoopie-sling suspension combined with a cinch-buckle, creating a very versatile combination. The Dutch Buckle itself and its accompanied whoopie-sling are both adjustable, allowing for very precise adjustments to be made to the pitch of the hammock.

The other really beautiful thing about the Dutch Buckle combined with the whoopies is that it eliminates the need for the marlin-spike hitch knot normally required to use whoopie slings. The whoopie simply loops over the Dutch Buckle itself. This makes the system both simpler and more fool-proof. With the marlin-spike system, the marlin-spike hitch must be tied correctly, and the whoopie-sling must be place on the knot or the system could fail. The Dutch Buckle eliminates all this nonsense, while adding a little extra versatility as well.

The only downsides are that you may need to modify your hammock to add the whoopie-slings, and the provided whoopie-slings are rather long so tree close together may not work with this system.  However, these are only minor downsides.  Overall, this is a fantastic lightweight hammock suspension that is great for backpacking in most scenarios.

One thing I would suggest doing is leaving off the standard whoopie-slings and ordering a separate set of Dutchware Whoopie-Hook Suspensions, which provide you with the option to easily change from the Dutch Buckle/Whoopie-Hook suspension to a daisy-chain style suspension without having to modify your hammock every single time.

Dutchware Cinch-Buckle Complete Suspension

Looking for a reasonably lightweight hammock suspension that will get you through almost any hanging situation? Look no further than the Dutchware Cinch-Buckle Complete Suspension.

dutchware cinch buckle suspension

Dutchware Cinch-Buckle Complete Suspension, via Dutchware

Specs

Source: dutchware.com

With cinch-buckle, amsteel loops, Dutch Clips, and 15′ tree staps included.

  • Weight: 9.1 ounces / 259 grams

Pros

  • Relatively simple and easy-to-use
  • Extremely Versatile
  • Fairly Lightweight
  • Allows for precision adjustments

Cons

  • Installation may require modification of hammock

Conclusions

The Dutchware Cinch-Buckle Complete Suspension is a great middle-of-road suspension that provides maximum versatility in a fairly lightweight package. Its ability to perform precision adjustments combined with the ability to span almost hanging scenario (short or long alike) makes it a suspension that could be left on your hammock nearly 100% of the time.

Replete with a Dutch Clip for fast tree strap installation, this cinch-buckle system is nearly fool-proof, just as long as you thread the tree straps through the buckle properly. This requires a little bit of attention to detail at first, but once you learn it, the task becomes quick and automatic. The addition of the Dutch Clip really helps set this system apart in terms of usability.

The one minor drawback of this (and literally every other cinch-buckle system on the market) is that you may have to modify your hammock to attach the amsteel loops onto the ends of your hammock. It’d be great if Dutchware provided one of their little Whoopie Hooks on the end of the amsteel loops that would allow easy installation and removal onto any hammock with loops already attached to the hammock ends.  Of course, if you’re handy, you could modify the system to work this way for maximum versatility.

Overall, I do think that the Dutchware Cinch-Buckle Complete Suspension is a top choice in its category.

More Recommended Cinch-Buckle Style Systems

Warbonnet Outdoors Complete Webbing/Buckles Suspension: A solid and lightweight (6.4 oz / 181 grams) cinch-buckle system. Definitely requires tying a slippery half-hitch knot in tree strap above buckle to prevent slippage.

Arrowhead Equipment Cinch Buckle Kit: Nearly identical to the Warbonnet offering above, but costs $10 more and weighs a bit more (7.5 oz / 213 grams). I’d also recommend tying the slippery half-hitch in the webbing to prevent slippage for this system as well.

Dutchware Whoopie-Hook Suspension

Whoopie-Slings are the standard ultra-lightweight suspension style for weight-conscious hammock backpacker. Dutchware’s Whoopie-Hook Suspension ups the ante with whoopie-sling suspension that is also easy to add or remove from any hammock equipped with loops on the hammock ends. As such, this is likely the ultimate ultra-lightweight hammock suspension system!

whoopie hook suspension

Dutchware Whoopie Hook Suspension, via Dutchware

Specs

Source: dutchware.com

With whoopie-slings, amsteel loops, Dutch Clips, and 4′ tree staps included.

  • Weight: 4.4 ounces / 124 grams

Pros

  • Very Lightweight
  • Allows for precision adjustments

Cons

  • Cannot span short hanging distances (less than 15 feet / 4.5 meters)
  • Attachment of whoopie-slings to tree straps may be difficult for new users

Conclusions

The Dutchware Whoopie-Hook Suspension is our pick for the best ultra-lightweight hammock suspension. It’s like just about any other whoopie-sling style suspension, except with whoopie-hooks that allow it to easy attach or detach from the loops on the ends of the hammock.  This makes it much easier to swap out suspensions. Too boot, it comes with a Dutch Clip that makes attached and detaching the tree straps from the trees a breeze.

This system is pretty much the most balanced combination of ease and usability among hammock suspensions that weigh less than 5 oz. And if you want to shave the weight further, skip the Dutch Clips.  If you are an ultra-lightweight backpacker looking for the maximum weight-savings while solid usability, this is the hammock suspension for you.

However, if you are willing to take on the extra couple ounces of weight, I’d recommend going with the Dutchware Dutch Buckle system listed above. The Dutch Buckle makes the whoopie-slings an absolute breeze. Without the Dutch Buckle, you have to tie a knot (usually a Marlin-Spike hitch), which can be fun for some users but a hassle for others. The addition of the knot and the specifics of where to place the whoopie-sling on the knot also adds potential for ending up on the ground if not done properly.

In all, this suspension I think is reserved for the hardcore weight-cutters, and most whoopie-sling purchasers should go for the Dutch Buckle system.

Factors for Choosing Hammock Straps and Suspension Systems

Buying a suspension system for your hammock can be confusing. Often it is not as simple as just picking out a pair of tree straps and calling it done. Read below for the top considerations you should have in mind when shopping for hammock suspensions.

Hammock Specifics

Your hammock suspension setup will depend on the specifics of your hammock. The easiest scenario is that your hammock already has loops on the hammock end which can be connected to the tree straps using a carabiner. The two most popular hammock brands, ENO and Kammok, both have their hammocks setup this way to ensure ease of use. However, there are tons of hammocks on the market, and how each on is built may vary.

If your hammock does not have loops on the end, I recommend that you modify your hammock and attach loops yourself. The specifics of this process depends on your hammock, but once you get the loops on there, it makes it way easier to use the standard hammock suspension systems of today. Our friend Derek at the Ultimate Hang has more on continuous loops for hammocks here.

Hammock Use

How will you be using your hammock? Just hanging in the yard for a few hours? Or going on a full-blown backpacking trip with a hammock as your shelter?

If you are just using your hammock casually, or perhaps using it for a car camping trip, you can get by with a basic “daisy chain” style setup (Kammok Python Straps are our favorite of these).

For backpacking, you can also use a daisy chain suspension system, but these are bit on the heavy side. As such you may be better served going with a lightweight “cinch buckle” or “whoopie-sling” style suspension.

If you camp in areas where trees are few and far between (e.g. the desert Southwest) and hanging situations are often challenging, you may want to avoid whoopie-sling style suspensions as they are not a versatile (they are better for long spans) as the other suspension types.

The gist of it is, daisy-chain style suspensions can be used by just about anyone, but if you’re backpacking, the cinch-buckles are lighter and more versatile, and the whoopie-slings are the lightest in weight.

More Hammock Resources from Mountain Tripper

Looking for the perfect camping hammock? Check out our article on the Best Hammocks

Want to stay dry while hammock camping? We’ve got you covered with the Best Hammock Tarps

Do you get a cold butt while in your hammock? Check out the Best Hammock Sleeping Pads

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